Environmental conservation

Our environmental conservation efforts include:

  1. Addressing policy reviews on the use of natural resources.
  2. Researching and reporting on resource utilization and land use management to local communities.
  3. Engaging in projects and training sessions to alter adverse human behavior.

Addressing policy reviews on the use of natural resources.

The natural environment is a source of a wide range of resources that are often exploited for economic profit. Among notable examples are clean water from natural streams, timber from forests, fish from lakes and rivers, sand, game and minerals. Adequate regulations are necessary to ensure responsible use of these resources and by extension, protection of the environment.

Putting restrictions on the use of resources by the native people has generated conflict between conservationists and rural communities in many regions. Our strategy is to take proper account of everyday needs of the local people when advocating for reviews.

These needs sometimes have to be substituted for better, cheaper options that are in line with conservation needs. Arriving at solutions that are acceptable between stakeholders is pivotal. Holding negotiations where conservationists and local people are both trying to have their needs catered for is never easy; but the resulting decisions are usually longer-lasting for both conservationists and local people.

Among the practices commonly requiring regulations are:-

  • Illegal logging which contributes to deforestation and by extension global warming.
  • Uncontrolled Sand harvesting which contributes to soil erosion and habitat destruction.
  • Poaching for illegal bush meat which endangers wildlife.
  • Poor agricultural practices resulting in degradation from chemical use.
  • Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing.
  • Hazardous mineral exploration and mining.
  • Hazardous Waste disposal.

Researching and reporting on resource utilization and land use management to local communities

As conservationists, we research and educate all stakeholders on the trends and process of environmental degradation and the negative effect these are having on our society. We communicate the full scope of the problem to the society at large.

For every Habitat destruction there is human activity involved. Economic advantage often linked to harvesting natural resources is a major impediment to environmental conservation. In communicating the effects and causes of habitat destruction, including mining, logging, trawling, and agriculture, we impact significantly behavioral change among people and influence positive environmental practices.

Agriculture, being the most preferred source of livelihood among rural communities, is one of the most destructive forces against conservation. Poor agricultural practices have resulted in more degradation. We advocate for the practice of conservation agriculture that comes with significant environmental benefits including less erosion possibilities, better water conservation, improvement in air quality due to lower emissions being produced, and a chance for increased productivity in a given area.

Engaging in projects and training sessions to alter adverse human behavior

A decline in the values of an ecosystem’s functions is primarily caused by human activity. Our strategy is to involve local people in the management of the environment by offering environmentally positive alternatives to adverse practices.

There is always the pressure to take proper account of everyday needs of the local people when formulating protection strategies. These needs sometimes have to be substituted for better, cheaper options that are in line with conservation needs. The emphasis is towards making joint decisions between stakeholders about how natural resources should be managed and protected. Arriving at solutions that are favorable for both conservationists and local community members is not easy; but for any decision to be long lasting, the needs of both conservationists and local people have to be catered for.